Article Image 31258

How does the dollar's value affect commodities prices?

The Federal Reserve's recent announcement that the dollar’s current interest rate is being maintained instead of increased had repercussions far beyond US shores. At the same time as the dollar fell against other leading currencies, commodity prices experienced a dramatic rise – bringing emerging market currencies along with them. The Money Cloud explores this relationship between the dollar and raw materials, as well as its implications for international money transfer.

The reasons for this inverse relationship

This inverted relationship was emphasised when the dollar hit a five-month low in March 2016; this dip coincided with commodities reaching their highest value since the end of 2015.

These shifts were sparked by the Federal Reserve’s decision to maintain its benchmark interest rate and to halve the previously forecast hikes of 2016 from four to two. A few hours after the announcement and commodity markets – led by oil and precious metals – were buoyant, while the dollar’s value plummeted.

Why? Well, nearly all commodities are bought and sold in dollars. This means that more dollars are required to buy goods if the currency’s value has fallen. Further, given that commodities are traded worldwide, a weaker dollar means commodities are less expensive in other currencies – this increases demand.

Oil

Although oil prices are still looking weak, the value of US crude oil recently reached a three-month high. This can be correlated to the preserved rate of inflation, which enhanced the purchasing power of those buying US oil using other currencies. This, in turn, increased demand, which helped to boost US oil’s value.

How other currencies are affected

When the Federal Reserve decided against interest rate rises, it wasn’t just the dollar and commodity markets that were affected – so too were the currencies of emerging and commodity-based markets. For example, since the Fed’s announcement, the currencies of Brazil, Mexico, Russia and South Africa have all strengthened.

This is because stalled interest rates imply a meek approach by the Fed to general monetary policy and also a fragile American economy. Neither of these factors inspire confidence in investors, prompting them to turn elsewhere – this decreases the dollar’s value. Meanwhile, economies reliant on commodity exports are benefiting from their increased value.

Changes in commodity prices, then, have a consequential impact on the world’s currencies. If you're transferring your money internationally, make sure you protect yourself against volatile markets with our currency comparison tool  and by future-proofing your transactions with the help of one of our trusted brokers.

Comparison tool

Sending Currency
Buying Currency
Send USD Receive

Latest Articles

Jane Hemming, Reading, UK

When buying a villa in Spain, The Money Cloud saved us over £5,000 in comparison to the quote from our bank.

Martin Ham

Very useful information and fairly up to date! I would definitely recommend the site for anyone interested in exchanging currencies!
Portugal property

MAKING OVERSEAS PAYMENTS FOR BUYING PROPERTY IN PORTUGAL

When purchasing property in Portugal, we explain all the steps involved in the purchase. We can demonstrate how to make the most of your money when making the international payments to cover the purchase price and associated costs and how to avoid exchange rate risks.

Paying overseas suppliers in their own foreign currency

PAYING OVERSEAS SUPPLIERS FOR GOODS AND SERVICES

When paying overseas suppliers on a regular basis, currency conversion costs as well as fees when using your bank all add up. The Money Cloud saves you money by introducing you to specialist foreign exchange companies when conducting overseas business purchases and expenses.

Market Insights

Sign up for our newsletter.

Thank You for subscribing to our Newsletter

You have successfully signed up to our Newsletter